Necessities: Power Tools

Remarkable tools for tapping into your creative subconscious and fueling your creative vision.


Leica Sofort Instant Camera & 60 mm Lens, Orange; $299; us.leica-camera.com
Gucci Constance Padlock Watch 30 x 34 mm, $850; gucci.com
MoMA Design Store Compact Toolbox, $100; store.moma.org
Montblanc Great Characters The Beatles Special Edition Pens, $720–$930; montblanc.com
KRINK K-55 Box Set Day-Glo Paint Markers, $72; shop.krink.com
Shinola Shinola + Bondhus L Wrench Set, $40; shinola.com
Faber-Castell Graf Von Faber-Castell Natural Leather Colouring Pencil Roll, $430; faber-castell.com
TAG Heuer Connected Modular Alec Monopoly Limited Edition, $1850; tagheuer.com
Moleskine Pen+ Ellipse Smart Writing System, $179; us.moleskine.com

Mini Mania Hits The Big Time

Iconic watches get comfortable with small-scale replicas of furniture classics. 

(Photo: Doug Young)

Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Chronograph 42 mm, $5,250; omegawatches.com
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DKR Wire Chair by Charles & Ray Eames from 1951, $325; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

A.Lange & Söhne Saxonia Moon Phase Black Dial, $29,000; alange-soehne.com
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Marshmallow Sofa by George Nelson from 1956, $795; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Cartier Santos de Cartier Large Model, $20,400; cartier.com
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Bocca by Studio 65 Sofa from 1970, $795; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time, $24,700; vacheron-constantin.com
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Lockheed Lounge by Marc Newson from 1986, $1,395; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Bulgari Octo Ultranero, $6,950; bulgari.com
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Heart-Shaped Cone Chair by Verner Panton from 1958, $335; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Breguet Classique 7787 Moon Phase, $30,200; breguet.com
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Johnson Wax Chair by Frank Lloyd Wright from 1939, $410; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Piaget Altiplano 38 mm, $15,200; piaget.com
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La Chaise by Charles & Ray Eames from 1948; $355; vitra.com


(Photo: Doug Young)

Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Black Matte Ceramic, $3,500; bellross.com
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Tulip Chair by Eero Saarinen from 1956, $285; vitra.com

Match Game: Boutique Watches + High Fashion

Independent watchmakers have a lot in common with today’s top designers.

They’re fearless risk takers, pushing boundaries with new shapes, innovative technologies, and high-tech materials. Preserving that independence allows for true individuality, giving watchmakers the ability to carve out unique identities and, in turn, enabling their products to stand out from the crowd. While many of these watchmaking marvels can stand alone by virtue of their complications and technical prowess, they are nonetheless meant to be worn. Sure, the watch you choose might be the rarest, the most complex, the most unusual. But if it doesn’t pair with your favorite outfit—game over.

Here, we’ve taken some recent standouts spotted at the Carré des Horlogers, the independent wing at the SIHH 2018 watch fair, and paired them up with groundbreaking trends from the spring/summer 2018 menswear collections. Result? The edgiest style inspiration you’ll need this year.


Valentino
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H. Moser

Venturer Concept Blue Lagoon; h-moser.com

Hermès
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HYT

h0 GOLD; hytwatches.com

Tom Ford
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Ferdinand Berthoud

Chronométre FB 1R. 6-1; ferdinandberthoud.ch

Bottega Veneta
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URWERK

UR210 Royal Hawk; urwerk.com

Brunello Cucinelli
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Laurent Ferrier

Galet Annual Calendar School Piece; laurentferrier.ch

Comme des Garçons
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Hautlence

Invictus Neon Yellow; hautlence.com

The Creative Godhead Behind Hollywood’s Must-Have Apple Watch Accessory

Close to the edge of a rooftop in Tribeca, Harry Bernstein struck a pose, the late afternoon sun filtering through his luxuriant curls.

Beneath him, in stacked glass conference rooms, sat dozens of employees, unaware that their boss was ably modeling a patchwork afghan, selvedge jeans, and a pair of fresh kicks, planted mere inches from the cold, upscale nothingness of undeveloped downtown airspace.

Indigo Patchwork Wrap, Rare Weaves; Indigo Shirt Jacket, Kapital; White T-Shirt, David Michael; Jeans, Double RL; Sneakers, Yeezy; Native American Bolo, vintage; Eyeglasses, Warby Parker

Here’s what they did know: This man on the roof is an advertising godhead, the reason Boost Mobile demanded to know “Where You At?”; the reason Shaquille O’Neal played an improbable jockey for Vitamin Water; the reason kids line up for Supreme drops; and, arguably, the reason influencer marketing exists at all.

Harry “Bee” Bernstein, founder of the groundbreaking digital ad firm Annex 88 (neé, The 88) and current chief creative officer at Havas Worldwide’s flagship New York agency, radiates the excitement of someone coming off two decades of really, really good ideas.

“Let’s have a roof party and just pay the fine! We have good insurance!”

For most corporate heads with “chief” and “officer” in their titles, alfresco photoshoots come as rare as Peter Luger prime rib. But the prolific Bernstein—who does not eat meat—looks nothing like your average exec. He has called his style “streetwear clown,” but that misses the glorious high-taste-hippie of it all, as if Jerry Garcia had lived to see Adidas x Pharrell.

Despite the globally sourced wardrobe of an Afropop Worldwide listener, Bernstein counts a local upbringing—Queens, New York—as the source of his remarkable sensibility.

Apples & Bolos from Bernstein’s personal collection.

“In pre-internet life, what was cool was subculture, the underground and true rarity. Now, the market is about having what everybody else has. You used to want to remain in the subculture. Now everyone wants to be famous … [consumers] buy things because other people have it. Hypebeasts, literally, they buy things on hype.”

So when it came to his own closet, Bernstein, the master of starting and disseminating trends via social channels, wanted something different.

“I want to find a reason to find and to buy things. I had a Rolex that my dad gave me from the 1980s. It’s supreme, but it doesn’t feel like my luxury trope. Whereas what I’m wearing today, there’s a meaning, and a point, and a singularity. I’m searching for singularity, and a unique perspective on the world. That’s my job as Chief Creative Officer. So if I do what everyone else does, I’ll produce what everyone else does.”

One expression of this ethos, worn exclusively by Bernstein and a few high-echelon celebrities, are the turquoise-inlaid, metal-worked bracelet ends that he retrofits to accept an Apple Watch. These two components, from wildly different ends of the American crafts timeline, represent Bernstein’s major preoccupations: the interplay of digital and analog, the singular and the mass produced, the inert and the dazzlingly dynamic. Some of the bracelets use stylized snakes fashioned out of nails, others classic Zuni geometric patterns. Among the stones, the beveled face of a sleeping Apple Watch looks like an enormous black obsidian.

The combination is bizarre, striking, covetable. The backstory is just downright funny. It goes like this: Bernstein, on vacation in Taos, New Mexico, with his fiancée, becomes transfixed by an enormous piece of turquoise, which he promptly purchases for $5,000. It sparks an obsession. Eventually, he gets hooked up with Fish, a turquoise collector from Austin, Texas.

Native American Bolo, vintage; Indigo Patchwork Jacket and Indigo Scarf, Rare Weaves; White T-Shirt, David Michael; Eyeglasses, Warby Parker

“I went to Fish’s house and I didn’t know if I was buying speed or jewelry. There was a parrot and a guy in a La-Z-Boy. One room had flat files full of necklaces, rings. I tell him I was looking for bolos, and he takes me into the bathroom. He puts the seat down, I sit on the toilet, and there are drawers of different pieces.”

Bernstein received a crash course in the foyer. There’s little centralized information on turquoise jewelry, and widespread forgery makes expertise a necessary tool in finding the best pieces. Now, he’s deep into eBay auctions, message boards, ancient websites, hunting for quality stones and bits of history. Which is how, somewhere outside Austin city limits, 1,800 miles from Queens, our man finally found his subculture.

Back inside the Havas offices, after an impromptu piece of performance art—what does it mean to use a glass-walled office as a changing room?—Bernstein leapt barefoot onto his desk. Adorned in bangles, he struck another pose, half-yoga, half-Amy Cuddy, before settling for a Talmudic shrug.

Surveying the small group of employees below through discontinued Warby Parker frames—turquoise, of course—Bernstein murmured, “I’ve done this one before, but it works.” 

Yoga Top and Native American Bolo, vintage; Printed Camouflage Silk Pants, Advisory Board Crystals; Eyeglasses, Warby Parker.

Photos by Christopher Garcia Valle. Styling by Dylan Hogelin.