Raptures of the Deep

Photographs by Junichi Ito
Styling by Stephen Watson & Jared Lawton

Doctors call it nitrogen narcosis. Diving’s old guard call it Martini’s Law. Both mean the same thing: For every 15 meters of depth, the physical effect is equivalent to one drink. Euphoria? Hallucinations? All that and more. But you don’t need an underwater trip to see that modern sports watches are reaching higher levels of dry-land appeal. Slowly surface. It’s time to decompress.

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Selfwinding Chronograph, $26,600; audemarspiguet.com
Cartier Calibre de Cartier Carbon Diver Watch, $8,950; cartier.com
Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Bathyscaphe Day Date 70s, $12,700; blancpain.com
Hublot King Power Titanium Oceanographic 4000, $20,600; hublot.com
LEFT: Rado Tradition Captain Cook MK III, $2,550; rado.com RIGHT: TAG Heuer Aquaracer Calibre 5, $2,400; tagheuer.com
Panerai Luminor Submersible 1950 3 Days Automatic Oro Rosso, $26,700; panerai.com
Rolex Sea-Dweller, $11,350; rolex.com
LEFT: Vacheron Constantin Overseas, $20,900; vacheron-constantin.com RIGHT: Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Diver, $3,700; bellross.com

Hit List: Oris Aquis Diver Source of Life Limited Edition

Limited to 2,343 pieces.

At first glance, the Source of Life Limited Edition from Oris is a handsome dive watch complete with standard features such as a unidirectional rotating bezel, applied indices filled with Super-LumiNova and water resistance to 300 meters. But beneath its surface, the model—whose caseback is embossed with a map of the 766-mile River Rhine—is described by the Swiss watchmaker as a “philosophical watch,” intended to draw attention to water’s life-sustaining properties.

Oris Aquis Diver Source of Life Limited Edition

$2,200 on rubber strap, $2,400 on stainless-steel bracelet; oris.ch